Yellow Tulips

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doodles 

Last weekend in Edinburgh, on the round curve of Victoria Street up in a high annex window above the sixth floor, I spied a very lovely old gentleman tending to vaseful of fresh yellow tulips. He was so contentedly framed by the blue wood frame — and utterly oblivious to our cold-noses and wind-swept faces as we craned up at him. Quentin Blake could have done something perfect about it.

Old Man 2

 

… But I gave it a dab hand anyway.

Charlotte xx

 

 

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Edinburgh Weekend

 hello edinburgh!

BFS – EDI £70 RTN

     Spending a January weekend in Edinburgh is what I imagine being trapped in Hogwarts at winter would be like: it’s cold, it snows, and there’s windy-wee-passages and cosy shops to get trapped in. Just what Rebecca and I were looking for for a best-friend birthday-mashup weekend!

      I’ve never seen anything quite like the old town streets that wind and nestle on the hill. From above, Edinburgh Castle juts proudly over the city atop an outcrop of sheer rock-face, while the rest of the city’s old sandstone houses stretch up over six floors towards the cloudy sky.

City spires

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out & about

     Museums and independent trinket shops are right up my street, and Edinburgh has them aplenty. 10/10 to the National Portrait Gallery, and special mention to The Red Door Gallery, which stocks a fabulous amount of my illustrator idol, Gemma Correll.

photo 1 copy photo 4 copy 2 photo 5 copy

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top eats

     I spent a lovely couple of days jumping in and out of Edinburgh’s deliciously heated trinket shops and restaurants — a great excuse for eating my way around the city. Nom nom treats for my belly.

Recommendations are…

FIRST PLACE           The Outsider – Rabbit pie, pureed veg, and mash £7.20
Best find of Ed, ridiculously reasonable lunch prices – yet classy.

NARROW SECOND   Henderson’s  (Vegan + Veggie) – Stuffed peppers £10.95
Cosy, with piano-tinkling and amazing vegan and veggie food. Yes, please.

DELICOUS 3RD        Bread Meats Bread — BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich £7
Absolutely packed on a Sunday night for the best pulled pork I’ve had.

    Of course, I visited The Elephant House for a glimpse of the space where J K Rowling dreamt up the fabulous magicalness of Harry Potter. Strangely, but perhaps appropriately, I found Harry Potter’s world in the Loos, where hundreds of devotees had scribbled their love of magic.

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     On my last night, Rebecca and I made good use of the little pool, steam room, and sauna at Novotel (where the revolving front door refused to co-operate with Rebecca’s feet). It was puuuuuurfect for warming our wee fingers and toes after a chilly weekend.

Blueskyhouses

 

     Edinburgh you were lovely,

Charlotte xx

From Nanjing

nanjing trees

南京

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幾個月前我和幾個歐洲同學離開繁華的上海城市,坐了一個小時半的火車去南京過一個週末。南京那時候正是秋高氣爽的季節,所以我們這些外國人穿著大外套,看起來好像愛斯基摩人。

我們在紫金山待了一整天,我們选擇到南京紫金山遊玩是因為它的綠化好,也因為它的風景好,更因為它的空氣好。這座小山蓋上了一片厚厚的落葉,而且我們也在深綠樹林的擁抱裡,感覺像進了安靜睡夢山的夢幻境界一様。

因為南京那個礼拜六的气溫跟我的國家很接近,乜因為這些正在落葉的樹讓我想起童年跟家人在家乡附近森林一起散步的回億。

我眼前跟風飄的葉子好像池子裡又小又亮的顽皮金魚,看著它們輕輕地在小山的路上躺著,滿地的落葉鋪成金黃色的路。我站在冷風的樹下聽著那些顽皮金魚在一起唧唧喳喳,我身邊的微風好像了解我就像录野仙踨的桃樂絲一樣,渴望能走這條金黃色的路回家。

我突然听到有人在叫我的名字,而且是我的名字,但這不是我熟悉的父母的声音,這是我熟悉的同学的聲音,叫我 “快一点″!突然間我在想的白日夢都消失了,我的臉上露出了笑容,我這条路上還剩下许多等著我去嘗試的奇遇。

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nanjing

Year Abroad: Trip to Zhujiajiao

朱家角
Zhu Jia Jiao

Pu An Road Station 普安路 –  Zhu Jia Jiao 朱家角: 12¥
35mins-1hr (traffic dependant)

Sights: Ke Zhi Garden,
Qing Dynasty Post Office,
Shen Ming Bridge,
Town God Temple.

 Restaurants Zhejiajiao

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This week, with my mum here in Shanghai, we took a half-day trip across the city to the water town Zhu Jia Jiao.

I’ve managed to get by for nine months referring to the town in a nonchalant jumble of Z sounds and a vague hand-wave (with any old tone thrown in for good measure), and this trip involved a full day of avoiding it like the plague, twisting my mouth into unintelligible Chinese when it was only explicitly necessary.
Unsurprisingly, that was fairly often.

It’s a speedy bus journey out of the city on the huge concrete flyovers that head south-west towards Shanghai province’s inland lakes and rivers, and the bouncy journey on China-style suspension is tempered only by the no standing system (I take a seated China-style snooze).

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Sheng Ming Bridge Zhejiajiao

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ZhuJiaJiao is a different feel to Suzhou, with its Old Town constrained within a 15min radius of sharp, twisting alleys, packed with noisy sellers and nosier tourists, but in the blazing sun it certainly has its own charm – particularly in its two storey canal-side tea houses and restaurants.

A maze of traditional wooden shutters, whitewashed walls, and dubiously constructed bamboo scaffolding that marked large-scale maintenance of it’s traditional architecture, the Old Town is a strange mix of the locals everyday life, adapted to the hundreds of camera-wielding tourists that march through every day between 9AM-5PM.
After hours, I imagine, is entirely more pleasant.

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Traditional Wooden Second Floor Zhejiajiao

Tea Houses, Zhejiajiao

Alley Teashops Zhejiajiao

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With a slow-paced wander around the Old Town, Mum and I get a noodle and wonton soup lunch upstairs in a quiet restaurant. I’d suggest checking out what the upstairs of your chosen lunch establishment is like before committing, lest you end up like us, with our windows bizarrely facing over the street and dry, latticed scaffolding instead of the picturesque tourist canal.

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Tiled Roof Zhejiajiao Resturant

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By the end of the day, I did reluctantly learn to pronounce ZhuJiaJiao.
You know, that pretty water town place, she says, gesticulating vaguely.

Charlotte xx

Year Abroad: Thoughts on Being Squashed

TOP MUSEUMS 

China Art Museum: Free ✌️

ROCKBUND, Misdemeanours Exhibition: 25¥

MOMA, Dior Exhibition: 50¥ (Student 25¥) FINISHED

Shanghai Propaganda Museum: 20¥

Urban Planning Museum: 50¥ (Student 15¥)

MOMA, Yayoi Kusama Exhibition: 50¥ (Student 25¥) FINISHED

“WHY ARE THERE SO. MANY.  PEOPLE.”

This startlingly familiar, and inevitably rhetorical, question is one that often drifts into mind when I find myself splayed and squashed, chest-to-back, in a confused cross between queuing and crowd-mobbing in China. National Holidays, rush hours, and anything Public Transport – the sheer mass of people is terrifying.

I’M IN A MUSEUM

 Now I don’t know what comes to mind when you think about heading to a museum, but a small scale battle is probably not the first image, what with with the elbow-vying for the perfect shot, the walking-speed race to reach the exhibit, and the split-second warning of a frantically wiggling flag that leads the dreaded tour guide of locals to descend upon your moment with Picasso.

In a brash, flap of tangled camera straps, and hot jackets, knees and elbows, the Chinese tour descends suddenly with its 120 decibel, robot-like tour guide, and sweeps itself off just as suddenly.

Reminiscent of a drilled march, the pit-stops allow tour groups to furiously snap photos at head-height (and by that, I mean my 5″8 head), with barely a glimpse of the attraction that isn’t through a small 3×4, pixellated viewer screen.

It’s not quite the quiet afternoon I usually have in mind when I leave my room for an exhibition.

THE MUSEUM

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Trip to the Museum

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YOU THINK IT’S JUST CHINA?

Well, obviously, it’s not.
From concerts, to the barely civilised mob before the rather smug-looking Mona Lisa
Louvre, you gotta love crowds.

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Signature

Year Abroad: Tianjin Travels

TO TIANJIN!

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Off the HSR at Tianjin Railway Station

Off the High Speed Rail and into the bustle at Tianjin Railway Station.
Beijing – Tianjin: 54.50¥
Shanghai  – Beijing: 550¥

It’s autumn in China, and I recently made a trip out of the bustle of Shanghai up to Tianjin, where over the course of four days I managed to amass a large amount of photos of the journey, the city, and very few of myself and my friend Peter.
(Sorry, Pete.)

In comparison with Big Ol’ Shanghai, Tianjin is pretty chilled and quiet city, and I’ve spent a lovely four days wandering some of it’s least tourist-trekked streets, thanks to my trusty guide, as well as some of it’s Lonely Planet-style tourist attractions. Despite the fact that Tianjin covers an area some six times larger than Shanghai, it’s population is only half that of the shiny southern city – and it shows. The streets are chilled, the metros are only quietly bustling, and the people are friendly (what a shock to the system).

Take note Shanghai.

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REAL CHINA

We start off the trip with an excellent 6¥ bowl of noodles at what Pete has dubbed ‘Man and Wife Pull Noodles’, a tiny, tiny, tiny restaurant that sits in a rickety road alley just by Tianjin Experimental High School. If you haven’t tried eating where the locals eat, you’re missing out on a real and genuine experience of China. This street is lined with lots of similarly miniature restaurants, all of which have been dubbed with fabulous English names by the local, non-Chinese speaking foreigners, and are flocked with tracksuited schoolkids at lunch (beware).

I keep accidentally calling the restaurant ‘Man on Wife Pull Noodles’, much to everyone’s delight.
Well, it is a bit of a mouthful.

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By Necessity, Alley Restaurant, Tianjin

These pretty bottles are filled with Chinese vinegar, and are perfectly lined up on our table (one of only three, in a space smaller than my tiny dormitory bedroom at Fudan University). The decor has definitely happened by necessity, and not because they’ve popped down to the local Ikea.

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Cat in Basket, Waiting

Oh, and here’s a Cat in Basket outside the shop.
Why are you so grumpy, kitty!

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I’M A TOURIST!

Next, I get the grand tour! Try the Tianjin Radio Tower, 1 Weijin South Rd, Hexi, Tianjin in summer for a great view of the surrounding city. On a smog-free day take the cheeky elevator up with a 50¥ Adult ticket (20¥ Consession/Student), and check out the span of the sprawling city. Afterwards, the nearby Lake Park 水上公园  is perfect for a relaxed stroll and watermelon on a stick! The attractions themselves are all a little worn out and dusty, with lots of attendants that seem to be there mostly for show – but worth visiting for the strangeness of it all. Other tourist spots worth a visit are the shiny, new Museum District, the Italian Quarter, the Old Town and the Tianjin Eye.

Radio Tower in winter  is an absolutely amazing sight.
Tianjin is b-e-a-utiful in winter, if not horrifically cold.

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 Tianijn Radio Tower

Tianijn Radio Tower.

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If you get a chance, go for a stroll around the local areas (or a bike ride if you can find one and are savvy enough not to get killed on raod that have a fairly relaxed attitude to general traffic laws). Out by Wujiaoyao the two story houses and residential streets are slow paced, and filled with wandering elderly people in faded floral packs; the wide, dry streets are sparsely tree-lined and seemingly under constant renovation, with building dust churning now and then under our shoes. Card playing old men in dark jackets shout in tense, tight circles around makeshift tables.

We were very alternative, and took a stroll in the dark.

A NIGHTTIME STROLL IN TIANJIN

One lovely evening after a long day at the nearby Italian Quarter and Old Town, we take a stroll down along the HaiHe 海河 Riverside to soak up some more of Tianjin’s relaxed atmosphere, take some photos, and a look at night-time life.

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Tianjin Father and Daughter, Nighttime Radisson Building

A man and his daughter sitting in the glow of the Radisson Building.

Tianjin, Nightshift Nap

This man is taking the night shift on Tianjin Old Street very seriously.

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Over the Bridge, Tianjin

Over the Bridge.

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Three Men Fishing, Tianjin China

Three men fishing under an over pass; the man on the very left is wearing what’s left of his daytime, smart suit, while the older gentleman in the middle has the look of an old-timer to the trade.

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Tianjin Little Eats Street 天津小吃街

Little Eats Street, Tianjin is busy and bustling.

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Last Man Working, Nightshift Tianjin

Last man working the nightshift.

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The Clock, Tianjin

Tianjin Clock in some pretty cool looking light pollution.

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HEADING BACK


 “Home, James!” My family say this when we’re going home after a day out, but I don’t know why, or who this mysterious ‘James’ is. Peter made a face and sounded fairly insulted that I was calling him James… Does anyone else say this? Support would be greatly appreciated.

Anyway, after a long day out, we nip on the last metro of the evening on line three and head home!
Tianjin’s metro is wonderfully efficient, and much less overcrowded that Shanghai’s rush hour. English everywhere and friendly staff makes it a super easy tourist city.

Wujiaoyao Metro

I love how symmetrical everything is in the station, and as a treat, they’ve opened the backs of all the metro coin machines –  pretty neat.

From the White Lights, Lamps in the Dark, Tianjin

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AWAY I GO

View from the Window, China High Speed Train

At on my window seat back down to Shanghai as the High Speed Train hits 400km/h!

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It’s a long journey home when you’re leaving an old friend and heading back to a city that you can barely call home yet. It’s a seven hours door to door, and I do nothing more than doze, read and listen to music.

It’s been great to take a step back from Shanghai and chill out for four days from the stress of university level Chinese and watch Pete make all our transactions, translate, tour guide and generally be an excellent host. On the creative side of things, one of the great joys of touristing with a friend is you don’t have to feel nearly so ashamed of spending five minutes trying to get the shot that you want. So cheers to the large album dedicated to one of China’s five national central cities.

Hope I can come back soon,PhotoVogue Shelled Light, Charlotte Black

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.Charlotte xx

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PhotoVogue Shelled Light, Charlotte Black

Oh, hey there Vogue, this is the Tianjin Railway station.

😝

Taiwan: A Goodbye Snap-shot Round-up!

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So I’ve reached the end of my Taiwan summer for another year, and it’s been an incredible journey across the world and along the island. I’ve really relished the time with my family before I leave for Shanghai and a long year of studying abroad. For my last Taiwan post, here’s a snapshot round-up of all the things I wish I had more hours in the day to write to y’all about…

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Some crazy, questionable advertising…

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Some interesting snapshots of Taiwan transport.

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Food, of course, from the incredible hot-pot dinners, to the weird and wonderful items at the local bakery.

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And, as always, it wouldn’t be my blog if I didn’t have photos of flowers, and trees, and general random vegetation.

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As I’m about to head of into the city forest of Shanghai for a year’s study at Fudan University, you can keep following my adventures in Asia under the tab Year Abroad on the main home menu! Keep in touch, and don’t be a stranger!

That’s all for now, Taiwan,

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Taiwan: Bypassed Towns

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Taiwan’s landscape is snaked with hundreds of interlinking highways that make traversing and travelling the tropical island very different to what the journeys some ten, twenty years ago used to be. The slick highways (高速公路, Gāosù gōnglù) overarch and tower over many of the once bustling valley towns and roadside villages that cluster around the heady traffic and it’s commerce, towns that as a result, have withered quietly. Journeying towards Miaoli town in Taiwan, we take the old roads, verges still trimmed, clipped, maintained for a ghost population of cars. We meet only heavy industrial trucks, rusted and creaking off the highway towards industrial plants, steel mills, dark, empty restaurants and indifferent beetle nut vendors.

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It’s after driving on these deserted mid-week roads for several hours that we pull in to rest at a small village, too small and empty and overshadowed by what is a monolithic structure, darkened by the presence of construction power beyond individual control. It’s quiet, and an old, gum-mouthed man watches out from a weathered face at our foreign intrusion into this silent, abandoned rest-stop; the overpass, high above, is silent also. We don’t stay long, and after a short walk along the struggling, polluted river that runs through the town, we also leave.

It’s a strange and unnerving result of progress.

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